Entertaining in the Valley: Host the Perfect Party at Fulton 555

Those who live in the condos at Fulton 555 not only have their dream home but great spaces in which to entertain friends and family. From the open-plan kitchens fitted with stainless steel Bosch appliances and hardwood floors to the rooftop terrace with enviable views of Hayes Valley, there is ample room to host memorable get-togethers, soirees, and parties. And it just so happens that the surrounding area has an abundance of stores to help you prepare.

Those who live in the condos at Fulton 555 not only have their dream home but great spaces in which to entertain friends and family. From the open-plan kitchens fitted with stainless steel Bosch appliances and hardwood floors to the rooftop terrace with enviable views of Hayes Valley, there is ample room to host memorable get-togethers, soirees, and parties. And it just so happens that the surrounding area has an abundance of stores to help you prepare.

Lilikoi Design & Letterpress |171 Lily Street

The perfect party begins with the perfect invitation. Eschew email and text for a tangible invitation that will have your guests excited for weeks beforehand. Make an appointment at Lilikoi Design & Letterpress, a beautiful little Lily Street setup that celebrates the antiquated art of the letterpress. Ink is mixed specifically for each job before being applied to the printing plate, and each of your bespoke items is created one at a time. You don’t need to stop at invitations either. How about getting a dinner menu or wine list printed? That would be a lovely souvenir for your guests to take home.

True Sake |560 Hayes Street

Want to impress guests with something beyond the usual bottles of wine? Let us introduce you to True Sake—“America’s First Sake Store,” boasting an incredible selection of the Japanese rice wine for sale. Speak to the experts in this unique venue and learn how to distinguish your futsushu from your nigori from your honjozo. (It’s tough work, but you might have to try a few to get it right.) Then take a few bottles back to your kitchen at Fulton 555, be generous with the pours, and regale your guests with stories about your newfound hobby. Kanpai!

Ted’s Market |1530 Howard Street

Prefer to let someone else do the cooking? Since 1967, Ted’s Market, a mom and pop store on Howard Street, has been serving peckish San Franciscans with specialty sandwiches, tacos, gourmet cookies, and deli meats and cheese. Make the countertops of your luxury kitchen groan under the weight of Greek dolmades, Arabic tabouleh salad, New York steamed pastrami sandwiches, Black Forest ham, buttery pastries, and yogurt parfait. They deliver, so you needn’t leave home.

Steven Alan |445 Hayes Street

Azalea Boutique | 411 Hayes Street

Acrimony |333 Hayes Street

We knew we were forgetting something…YOU! How can you possibly be the perfect host if you’re not wearing the perfect outfit? Breathe a sigh of relief: Fulton 555 is surrounded by trendy boutiques, and three of the best are on nearby Hayes Street. Whether you decide to make a splash with a Geroux silk dress from Azalea, a Gitman Bros. Vintage shirt from Acrimony, or a showstopping pair of Annie Costello Brown earrings from Steven Alan, these shops will ensure you’re the belle/beau of your own ball.

Hayes Valley Events

Hayes Valley Haute Couture

Hayes Valley is undeniably cool. It seems that around every corner, there’s treasure waiting to be found in the form of pop-up restaurants, pocket parks, craft beer, and fine coffee. But, as the seasons change and autumn has you craving a fresh start, perhaps the best gems are hiding in plain sight.

Hayes Valley is undeniably cool. It seems that around every corner, there’s treasure waiting to be found in the form of pop-up restaurants, pocket parks, craft beer, and fine coffee. But, as the seasons change and autumn has you craving a fresh start, perhaps the best gems are hiding in plain sight. We’re talking about the boutiques. Whether your style leans toward vintage, is strictly modern, or falls somewhere in between, the upscale boutiques lining Hayes Street have you covered, and they’re only a short walk from the luxury condos at Fulton 555. Here are three of our favorites.

Dish | 541 Hayes Street

If you have a style that’s hard to describe in one word, you’ll probably feel right at home shopping at Dish. This boutique carries a generous, varied mix of designers, ranging from small and local to big and widely known. The result is a collection of women’s clothing that captures a full range of mood and personality. Maybe that’s why Dish earned a spot on Racked’s list for San Francisco’s Best Boutiques for Modern, Artsy Clothing. Striking a balance between modern sophistication and free-spirited ease can be tough, but Dish has done it. Think breezy, off-the-shoulder rompers and linen sundresses, with a feel that is both minimal and modern, plus just a hint of playful, bohemian flair. The clothes here are elegant and unfussy, and many of the ensembles feel like they could seamlessly translate from a rooftop cocktail party to a beach bonfire.

Reliquary | 544 Hayes Street

Those with a penchant for all things vintage won’t want to miss Reliquary. Here, retro and modern collide, and the result is a whimsical, eclectic mix of one-of-a-kind treasures and locally sourced, handcrafted goods. Owner Leah Bershad describes her shop as “a curiosity shop of sorts,” and the description rings true; you’ll find antique Navajo rugs and Amish patchwork quilts alongside clothing from small, local designers and small-batch perfumes. Racked called Reliquary “an excellent bet for one-of-a-kind goods,” and we can see why. You never know what sort of unique, irreplaceable gem you might discover on the racks. And, if you have a soft spot in your heart for sweet details, you’ll love the hand-sewn cloth tags Reliquary adds to all their vintage items, in order to mark, as they say, “the next chapter of the piece’s history.”

Triple Aught Design | 551 Hayes Street

Now, for the guys. If you’ve got an adventurous streak and a style that veers toward rugged, you’ll want to drop in on Triple Aught Design. Here, you’ll find top-notch, high-performance gear, the kind of durable, long-lasting backpacks, jackets, and jeans that you’d want to have close by on an epic hike or a jaunt through Europe. And if you’re not the mountain-climbing, tent-sleeping type, that’s okay, too—the apparel here translates as well in urban environments as it does atop glaciers. Not only are their goods American-made, but they’re also mostly made right here in San Francisco. This enables the staff to test the products and make adjustments as they go, resulting in impeccably constructed clothing and gear that will actually last.

Where to Eat

One of the most appealing aspects of life at Fulton 555 is the rich variety of food and drink options within easy strolling distance. Restaurants steeped in culinary traditions from around the world, with options both elegant and casual, always seem to be offering something new. A few Hayes Valley standouts are sure to become destinations for Fulton 555 residents, with something distinctive to tempt every palate.

One of the most appealing aspects of Hayes Valley condo life at Fulton 555 is the rich variety of food and drink options within easy strolling distance. Restaurants steeped in culinary traditions from around the world, with options both elegant and casual, always seem to be offering something new. A few Hayes Valley standouts are sure to become destinations for Fulton 555 residents, with something distinctive to tempt every palate.

Little Gem | 400 Grove Street

Little Gem, whose name is a pun on the tiny versions of romaine leaves that yield a perfectly tender and crisp salad, is indeed a local jewel. The food here is savory and sumptuous, and though you might not realize it, free of refined sugar, gluten, and dairy. In other words, for patrons with food sensitivities, Little Gem provides that rare restaurant experience where everything on the menu is fair game. Increasingly aware of the kinds of food challenges that hamper the enjoyment of some patrons, Little Gem’s founders, including Eric Lilavois (the former CFO of Thomas Keller Restaurant Group) and Chef Dave Cruz, decided to design a menu around the region’s finest ingredients. They get chicken from Marin Sun Farms, beans from Rancho Gordo, and beef from Five Dot Ranch. Produce is seasonal, so the menu shifts from month to month. Using ingredients like almond flour and quinoa, brown rice, eggs, and sweet potatoes, brunch is a sweet and savory treat on weekends. Though it’s become a mecca for those with food sensitivities, the fare at Little Gem is designed to appeal to everyone. Tempted by salmon tartare, spiced hanger steak, and bibimbap with seasonal vegetables, you’ll find that the few ingredients that aren’t included will be the furthest thing from your mind.

Petit Crenn | 609 Hayes Street

Chef Dominique Crenn has become a San Francisco culinary superstar in the last few years, having starred in an episode of Netflix’s acclaimed series Chef’s Table and won two coveted Michelin stars for Atelier Crenn, her bistro in Pacific Heights, among other accolades. But none of this attention has changed the way Crenn cooks or thinks about food, and her Hayes Street restaurant Petit Crenn is where she gets back to her culinary roots. Crenn was brought up outside Versailles in France and spent summers with her family in Brittany, the region where her mother’s family is from. Brittany is on France’s northwest coast, and Petit Crenn’s menu reflects this with an emphasis on seafood. With just 28 seats and an unpretentious all-white interior, this restaurant is different from Atelier Crenn, which serves complex dishes that are sometimes plated with bits of bark or moss for aesthetic effect. There’s no extra decoration here: fresh anchovies in olive oil, savory omelettes, grilled chanterelle mushrooms, and fresh razor clams are about as close to French comfort food as you can get in San Francisco.

Pläj | 333 Fulton Street

Just up the block from Fulton 555, a cozy yet modern restaurant called “Pläj” (which is pronounced “play”) offers a contemporary twist on traditional Swedish food. Densely floral Josef Frank wallpaper, dark wood paneling, and a cozy fireplace give the interior a rich sense of history, though the restaurant itself is barely five years old. Chef Roberth Sundell, a native of Stockholm, opened Pläj so that he would have a place to combine the Scandinavian ingredients he loves—herring, salmon, cloudberries—with the bounty of Northern California produce. Sundell’s interpretation of traditional white fish offers some surprising flavors: pickled onions, ginger, shallots, and hot dill oil. A sunchoke and beet salad is accompanied by hazelnuts and watercress as well as a Swedish cow’s milk cheese called Västerbotten. The Pläj burrata is truly multicultural: heirloom tomatoes and tender cheese are garnished with an aquavit vinaigrette. And if you come to Pläj with a craving for the traditional, the Swedish meatballs won’t disappoint: lingonberries and pureed potatoes with gravy accompany this surprisingly light and delicate main course.

Smitten Ice Cream | 432 Octavia Street

The name is no exaggeration: you’re apt to fall a little bit in love with the seasonal flavors of Smitten Ice Cream, home of the made-to-order scoop. Smitten is the brainchild of Robyn Sue Fisher, who began selling flash-frozen ice cream out of a Radio Flyer wagon in 2009, using liquid nitrogen and an ice cream machine she built herself. With each cone a kind of science experiment, Fisher’s style caught on, but what really hooks Smitten devotees are the flavors—fresh mint chip, Earl Grey with milk chocolate, mascarpone and strawberry, or brown sugar and cinnamon shortbread—none of which you’ll find in any supermarket freezer aisle. A visit to Smitten is akin to ordering at a cocktail bar: frozen treats are made right there, just for you. Smitten’s Hayes Valley location on Octavia Street (which happens to be the company’s very first) is situated just four blocks from Fulton 555, conveniently adjacent to Patricia’s Green and the colorful murals on Linden Street.

Meet the Designers

Every new luxury condo at Fulton 555 starts out as a blank slate, but the architectural bones of these innovative new residences set them apart from other San Francisco condos for sale. Courtesy of interior design by AubreyMaxwell, Robbie McMillan and Marcus Keller’s visionary firm, Fulton 555’s common areas and sample residences speak to the aesthetic and creative spirit of San Francisco—and Hayes Valley in particular. Bold colors and an array of objects and surfaces that reference different cultures and continents give these homes a worldly sophistication and a sense of adventure, but the sleek and modern architecture of Fulton 555 also lends itself to warm, welcoming, and highly textured design elements. “We believe folks are looking for a balance between the excitement of life in city-center and the comfort, warmth, and security of what it means to be ‘at home’,” says McMillan. “Texture plays an important role in the form of natural wood, ceramics, and textiles. Together, all of these elements work to create the feeling of home as sanctuary and respite from high-energy days on the go.”

Every residence at Fulton 555 starts out as a blank slate, but the architectural bones of these innovative new residences set them apart from other San Francisco condos for sale. Courtesy of interior design by AubreyMaxwell, Robbie McMillan and Marcus Keller’s visionary firm, Fulton 555’s common areas and sample residences speak to the aesthetic and creative spirit of San Francisco—and Hayes Valley in particular. Bold colors and an array of objects and surfaces that reference different cultures and continents give these homes a worldly sophistication and a sense of adventure, but the sleek and modern architecture of Fulton 555 also lends itself to warm, welcoming, and highly textured design elements. “We believe folks are looking for a balance between the excitement of life in city-center and the comfort, warmth, and security of what it means to be ‘at home’,” says McMillan. “Texture plays an important role in the form of natural wood, ceramics, and textiles. Together, all of these elements work to create the feeling of home as sanctuary and respite from high-energy days on the go.”

McMillan and Keller credit the neighborhood as a primary influence: “We were inspired by the strong design perspective of the Hayes Valley neighborhood and the incredible range of apparel and design resources just steps away from the building,” McMillan says. “Three of the local clothing stores stood out as distinctive profiles of design-driven Hayes Valley residents—Dish Boutique, Reliquary, and Triple Aught Design. We had a blast creating our interior design profiles to reflect the people we could imagine living in each of these unique homes.”

In other words, if these boutiques were Fulton 555 residents, what would their living spaces look like? This thought experiment ultimately formed the distinctive looks of each model residence. So, when AubreyMaxwell made Dish Boutique the unofficial mood board of the one-bedroom model apartment, they were attentive to Dish’s reputation for carrying the work of independent designers and catering to shoppers with a clear affection for nature and a “modern bohemian aesthetic.” The Dish shopper wears stylish sandals and little or no makeup and craves texture and pattern, but only if it’s understated. Correspondingly, AubreyMaxwell used a dreamy grisaille wallpaper in the bedroom to evoke the delicate, slightly faded look of an antique print and included clusters of earthy ceramics by local artist Julie Cloutier. For the living area, Minimal, a local Hayes Valley purveyor of chic furniture and accessories, provided the Godot sofa by Menu, decorative throw pillows, and the Clamp floor lamp by Pablo Designs.

The two-bedroom model residence is the domain of Reliquary. AubreyMaxwell envisioned this home as the base for a dynamic duo, perhaps a millennial couple that loves to travel and bring back unique, eye-catching souvenirs from their adventures. McMillan describes the style as “eclectic and humorous, but sharp,” combining a sense of whimsy with an eye for style and a love of entertaining. Warm, but not stuffy. For this space, Minimal provided a welcoming and well-designed coffee table, which AubreyMaxwell paired with a custom Fulton sofa by the local furniture studio BenchMade Modern. The conversation piece on the coffee table is a stunning spherical ceramic vessel by Heather Rosenman, and gorgeous prints of Miles Jackler’s nature and surfing photography liven up the walls. A custom cabinet with a bright yellow “horn,” evocative of an old-fashioned phonograph, pipes music via a hidden Bluetooth speaker.

For the townhome, the pair looked to Triple Aught Design for inspiration and determined that the interior design would cater to a “sharp yet casual outdoorsman and traveler,” someone who enjoys spontaneity and all the pleasures that Northern California has to offer. “In the townhouse model home, it becomes clear the resident has a love of surfing and nature,” says McMillan. “Our goal at Fulton 555 was to address every open wall space and show how each area of a home can be activated by a personal art collection displayed with careful consideration.” Therefore, a grouping of Miles Jackler images evoke sun and sand in the atmospheric study, while, in the living area, a cluster of decorative sake bottles from nearby True Sake offers a distinct and different twist on the traditional cocktail hour. Meanwhile, in the bedroom, AubreyMaxwell utilized the expertise of Paloma, a local studio that produces one-of-a-kind leather goods by hand. The weathered headboard looks like an antique, but, in fact, it traces its roots straight to modern-day Hayes Valley, where designers and craftspeople deftly combine old and new. McMillan is hopeful that Fulton 555 residents will embrace the ethos of these local creators: “We partnered with the vibrant community of small businesses, artists, and makers in the area to create a design language that reflects this unique place and the tremendous talent that helps to define it. We’d like to encourage investigation of the vast resources for design, art, and lifestyle all around you at Fulton 555.”

Seasonal Happenings and Events

Hayes Valley may be known primarily for its hip boutiques and high-end cuisine, but it’s more than just a “haven for shoppers and bon vivants,” as 7x7 phrased it. In fact, Hayes Valley and its neighboring communities are also at the center of a vibrant arts scene, evidenced by the sheer amount of concerts, shows, exhibitions, and festivals unfolding in the area. But a person can only be in one place at a time, and residents of the Fulton 555 condos may find that, with the never-ending roster of events planned around Hayes Valley, it’s difficult to narrow down your choices. We can help. Now that we’ve entered the heart of summer, here are some of our picks for not-to-be-missed, end-of-summer happenings in the vicinity.

Hayes Valley may be known primarily for its hip boutiques and high-end cuisine, but it’s more than just a “haven for shoppers and bon vivants,” as 7×7 phrased it. In fact, Hayes Valley and its neighboring communities are also at the center of a vibrant arts scene, evidenced by the sheer amount of concerts, shows, exhibitions, and festivals unfolding in the area. But a person can only be in one place at a time, and residents of the Fulton 555 condos may find that, with the never-ending roster of events planned around Hayes Valley, it’s difficult to narrow down your choices. We can help. Now that we’ve entered the heart of summer, here are some of our picks for not-to-be-missed, end-of-summer happenings in the vicinity.

 

UnderCover Presents a Summer Series Finale | 201 Franklin Street

 

If your summer music rotation is feeling a little stale right about now, heading to an UnderCover Presents show is a fail-safe cure. The dream child of Lyz Luke and Charith Premawardhana, UnderCover Presents takes classic, beloved albums and invites a wide range of Bay Area musicians to reimagine and reinterpret the music. Luke says that her mission is to strengthen the sense of community among Bay Area musicians by creating opportunities for collaboration and friendship. In a recent interview with KALW, she reminded listeners that, rather than being a musician, her official job title is “Music Enabler.” Her goal might be to bolster the musical community, but the result is a series of epic, imaginative concerts, the likes of which aren’t replicated anywhere else. In the past, they’ve tackled albums like Bob Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisited, Bob Marley’s Exodus, and the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Now, as August is upon us, it’s time to get your tickets for the UnderCover SFJazz Summer Series Finale. This epic show will pay tribute to some giants of jazz—Nina Simone, Ray Charles, Miles Davis, and the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section—with each night featuring a line-up of beloved local musicians. The series runs August 17th – 20th.

 

Concerts at The Fillmore | 1805 Geary Street

 

Summer in the Bay Area isn’t complete without a night at The Fillmore, swaying alongside your fellow concertgoers beneath the sparkling, gargantuan chandeliers. Built in 1910, the historic venue spent most of its life as a dance hall, with a short stint as a roller rink in the ‘40s. If you haven’t made it out for a show yet, don’t fret: there are plenty of options left on the schedule this summer. In fact, here are some of the performances that are still ahead: A-WA with Afrolicious (August 4th), Pokey LaFarge with Ruston Kelly (August 19th), and August Alsina with Rotimi and Tone Stith (August 30th).

 

Timbuk2’s “We Rollin’ Scavenger Hunt” | 506 Hayes Street

 

This event is a little more off the beaten path than our other picks, but we think it’s a promising way to spend a Friday. Timbuk2, a local messenger-bag maker, has been hosting a series of parties all summer. The self-defined aim of this “general revelry” is to “delight your senses and wet your whistle.” Indeed, their     grown-up scavenger hunt, focused on bikes, food, and drink, promises to be a playful way to close out your summer and welcome the fall. Check it out on September 8th.

Hayes Valley Events

San Francisco’s Japantown

Spending even a small amount of time in the neighborhood surrounding the condos at Fulton 555 makes clear that Hayes Valley offers world-class cuisine and a thriving entertainment scene, and a very special element of the global culture is only a short walk away.

Spending even a small amount of time in the neighborhood surrounding the condos at Fulton 555 makes clear that Hayes Valley offers world-class cuisine and a thriving entertainment scene, and a very special element of the global culture is only a short walk away.

A few blocks north of your Hayes Valley home is Japantown, the largest and oldest designated community of Japanese Americans in the United States. In these communities, the Nikkei—emigrants and their descendants who form the Japanese diaspora outside of Japan—celebrate and preserve the traditions of their homeland while enriching their cities with diverse offerings of food, art, and other cultural expressions. Here are our recommendations for a day spent in San Francisco’s unforgettable Japantown:

Begin your visit with the right mindset by pausing for reflection at the Peace Pagoda in Peace Plaza. Gifted to San Francisco in 1968 by its sister city—Osaka, Japan—the five-tier concrete stupa or shrine is a monument designed by Japanese modernist architect Yoshio Taniguchi that seeks to inspire peace in all people, regardless of creed or race. In this same vein of harmony, Peace Plaza regularly hosts numerous traditional rites and events. People from all over the Bay Area converge throughout the year to celebrate Cherry Blossom Festival, Nihonmachi Street Fair, the Summer Obon Festival, and the Year-End Festival, and these gatherings and pursuits of community are integral to San Francisco’s long and storied history in the 20th-century peace movement.

As an important gateway from Asia to the United States, San Francisco has always been a prime spot for the introduction of new food. While “sushi” may be the first word that springs to mind when we think of Japanese cuisine, ramen is challenging it in popularity, and the place to find the best ramen ‘round the Bay is at Ramen Yamadaya. The food here is serious: the restaurant boils pork bones for more than 20 hours to produce the rich tonkotsu broth for their noodles, which are then topped with sumptuous slabs of tender, seasoned pork, eggs, and fresh scallions. Be it a cold day in the winter or a summer afternoon, any time is a good time to enjoy the comforting flavors of this traditional and hearty dish. Fear not, vegetarians and lovers of vegetarians, for this is still San Francisco. While traditional ramen broth is meat-based, Ramen Yamadaya offers a vegan version to rival their carnivorous offerings, so bring along the meatless advocates in your life and indulge together.

With your mind at ease from your stroll in the park and your stomach full, it’s time to settle in for some serious entertainment. If you’re passionate about film, then there’s only one place you need to go in San Francisco: The Dine-In Kabuki 8. With a full bar and restaurant, Kabuki is a great place to mingle before taking in a show. Over-21 events allow you to carry your cocktail, beer, or wine into the theatre, and the art gallery provides stimulating diversion before viewing award-winning and cutting-edge cinema like no other. And best of all, not only can you purchase your tickets online, but you can reserve your favorite seats, too, so that you can catch that new foreign flick you’ve been dying to see, before returning home, full of peace, ramen, and culture, to your luxury condo at Fulton 555.

It’s All in the Deal: Interiors and Perks of the Luxury San Francisco Condo

From its coffee shops and eclectic boutiques to the SFJAZZ Center, Hayes Valley is a microcosm of culture and cool. At its center, the immediate neighborhood surrounding Fulton 555 boasts urban amenities and green spaces as well as food and drink options to spare. But what about the interiors at our luxury San Francisco condos? What about the condominiums themselves, the finishing touches, the amenities? Let’s take a tour and find out.

From its coffee shops and eclectic boutiques to the SFJAZZ Center, Hayes Valley is a microcosm of culture and cool. At its center, the immediate neighborhood surrounding Fulton 555 boasts urban amenities and green spaces as well as food and drink options to spare. But what about the interiors at our luxury San Francisco condos? What about the condominiums themselves, the finishing touches, the amenities? Let’s take a tour and find out.

Choices Aplenty
Today’s luxury condo seeker wants choice, and Fulton 555 delivers. The first step is to pick out your residence. Whether you’re in need of a spacious Junior 1 Bedroom or full 1 Bedroom; looking for a bit more space in the form of a second bedroom or a home office; or seeking a capacious residence with master bedroom, walk-in closets, and two baths (Townhome), Fulton 555 will give you want you want.

The Finer Details
So you’ve picked the condominium for you; what can you expect from the interior? Thoughtful craftsmanship has informed every aspect of the residences at Fulton 555. Clean lines and pure light infuse these spaces. Sunlight streams in through floor-to-ceiling windows while crisp white walls meet with dark hardwood flooring. In the kitchen, stainless steel Bosch appliances combine the sleek with the practical, and elegant gray countertops echo the overall aesthetic of pure and simple elegance. And just as the cool whites contrast beautifully with the rich woods throughout your Fulton 555 residence, so do the sunken lights of the kitchen and bathroom complement the hanging lamps in the lounge areas. Keep your condo just as it is, or add your own color and personality to its canvas.

Unique Amenities
It’s not just the residences that have special touches: the entire Fulton 555 complex is peppered with additions that are both practical and luxurious. Hungry, but not in the mood to cook? Don’t worry about taking a detour on the way home – fresh, gourmet prepared foods are sold at the Onsite Grocery Market. Did your bike suffer a mishap on your daily commute? Get it fixed at

Fulton 555’s Bike Workstation.
Want to top up your tan while reading the paper, but don’t fancy going to a packed park? Juice yourself a drink and head up to Fulton 555’s exclusive Rooftop Terrace. Living in Hayes Valley is incredible. But sometimes it’s good to know you can be as productive as you want at home thanks to the conveniences offered by your luxury condominium. And here, Fulton 555 is second to none.

Deliciously Convenient: New Seasons Market to Open at Fulton 555

With museums, entertainment venues, restaurants, boutiques, and parks—there’s just no end to the benefits of living in Hayes Valley. Future residents of the Fulton 555 condos know that “Hayes Valley is a lifestyle” and flock to the area to be close to the best that San Francisco has to offer. They also know that, with so much to see and do, no one wants to waste time rushing about town on errands. But what if those errands were part of the fun? Better yet, what if they were just a quick trip downstairs, so close to your home you could stop in on your way out after breakfast and your way home after work?

With museums, entertainment venues, restaurants, boutiques, and parks—there’s just no end to the benefits of living in Hayes Valley. Future residents of the Fulton 555 condos know that “Hayes Valley is a lifestyle” and flock to the area to be close to the best that San Francisco has to offer. They also know that, with so much to see and do, no one wants to waste time rushing about town on errands. But what if those errands were part of the fun? Better yet, what if they were just a quick trip downstairs, so close to your home you could stop in on your way out after breakfast and your way home after work?

Known as “the friendliest store in town,” New Seasons Market will bring a convenient, community-centered shopping experience to its new 29,000-square-foot store at 555 Fulton. This West Coast neighborhood grocer is known for its people-first culture that builds and sustains relationships for the greater good. New Seasons Market champions the sustainable regional food economy and provides a bounty of fresh, local, organic food with a strong commitment to the region’s producers, farmers, fishers, and ranchers.

The new store at Fulton 555 will feature an abundant peak-of-the-season produce selection and sustainably raised meats and seafood, as well as a broad selection of grocery standbys. The store will also offer freshly made, chef-prepared deli and grab-and-go options, certified organic and non-GMO breads, foods for special diets, a wellness and body-care department, home goods from local artisans, a full-service floral department, and a substantial selection of beer and wine from the Bay Area and around the world.

Add to that aisles flooded with natural light, comfortable indoor and outdoor seating, and gourmet meals, sandwiches, fresh-brewed coffee, and baked goods and you’ll quickly realize that you’ll have a one-stop shop for all your grocery needs—right under your Fulton 555 Hayes Valley home. Convenience has never been so delicious. We can’t wait.

For updates or to learn more about the market, visit www.newseasonsmarket.com.

Local Libations: Hayes Valley Wine Bars

The San Francisco luxury condos at Fulton 555 embody the spirit of the world-class neighborhood of Hayes Valley, whose most remarkable quality is its effortless combination of cultural sophistication and physical beauty. It’s no wonder that this gem of a San Francisco neighborhood also boasts some of the best wine bars in the city. Each one of these elegant venues has its own innovative wine list and an atmosphere that perfectly complements the relaxed mood of the area. For a glass of wine and light fare after the symphony or an art opening, or simply for a long, relaxing evening with friends before heading back to your home in Hayes Valley, here are five of our neighborhood favorites.

 

The luxury condos at Fulton 555 embody the spirit of the world-class neighborhood of Hayes Valley, whose most remarkable quality is its effortless combination of cultural sophistication and physical beauty. It’s no wonder that this gem of a San Francisco neighborhood also boasts some of the best wine bars in the city. Each one of these elegant venues has its own innovative wine list and an atmosphere that perfectly complements the relaxed mood of the area. For a glass of wine and light fare after the symphony or an art opening, or simply for a long, relaxing evening with friends before heading back to your home in Hayes Valley, here are five of our neighborhood favorites.

 

Fig and Thistle | 313 Ivy Street

 

Fig and Thistle puts an emphasis on local wines, featuring a changing list of choices like Tag and Jug’s 2015 “Flora” cider and Viognier, an innovative blend that lives up to its sweet smelling name, while complementing the bar’s understated, rough-elegant ambiance, courtesy of repurposed furniture and dark wood floors. Sit back on a wooden bench beneath the hanging plants and try a local cheese plate with Kivelstadt’s 2015 Rose from Mendocino, and your whole system will be redolent with the flavors of the coast.

 

Pause Wine Bar | 1666 Market Street

 

Pause Wine Bar was placed on USA Today’s 10 Best list for nightlife in San Francisco, which celebrates the venue’s emphasis on eco-friendly wines. With a menu as carefully curated as its wine list, Pause offers a selection of foods that focuses on seafood and produce, so this is a place where you can snack and sip or stay for a whole meal. On Wednesday nights, this convivial wine bar also hosts what Thrillist has called one of the best trivia nights in San Francisco. Pause even opens early, at 4:30 pm, Monday through Saturday, making it the perfect spot for an afternoon gustatory treat, too.

 

Hotel Biron | 45 Rose Street

 

Hotel Biron is touted by Eater San Francisco as one of “SF Bartenders’ Favorite Spots to Drink,” and to understand why, look no further than its outstanding wine list and intimate setting. For a special celebration, gather friends and split a bottle of Domaine de l’Arlot, Clos des Forêts Nuits Saint Georges 1er Cru, a wine whose balance of acidity and density perfectly matches the Hotel Biron’s elegant, old-world-meets-new-world atmosphere. You can enjoy the wines here from as early as 5 in the evening until as late as 2 in the morning.

 

Birba | 458 Grove Street

 

Birba has what SF Gate calls a “European-style vibe” and an owner, Angela Valgiusti, who has  worked as sommelier at acclaimed Vietnamese restaurant The Slanted Door. The perfect venue for an intimate date, Birba has the feel of a neighborhood place for locals, modeled on the wine bars Valgiusti loves to visit in Florence. Try a glass of the Manincor 2014 Moscato Giallo with a bowl of marinated olives—as the sun goes down or anytime between 3 and 10 pm.

 

Noir Lounge | 581 Hayes Street

 

For a wine bar with real nightlife appeal, try Noir Lounge, where you can drink a local Pinot Grigio and eat tapas all night while 1940s Hollywood noir films play on big screens: a portal to a bygone era you can help invoke with an order of old-fashioned chive and lemon zest devilled eggs.

What’s Happening in Hayes Valley

Clear skies with sunshine are San Francisco’s autumnal trademarks, as are the requisite rituals like wearing warm wool sweaters and sampling anything and everything pumpkin-spiced. But living in one of the Hayes Valley condos at Fulton 555 makes the season a singularly cozy experience: at night, you can stay in with a comforting soup made from scratch with fresh ingredients from the on-site grocery store. But why not have an evening—or a few evenings—out on the town? At these luxury condos in Hayes Valley, you’re in the cultural center of the city, which means you’ll always find something enlightening to add to your list of seasonal activities.

San Francisco Ballet: Let’s Dance | 301 Van Ness Avenue

Don’t just let you children have visions of sugarplums dance in their head, let them pirouette and chassé as Sugar Plum Fairy—and all of the characters from the Nutcracker—themselves! As a fall preview to the San Francisco Ballet’s favorite holiday dance tradition. During this interactive workshop, parents and children learn about the choreography, music, costumes, and history of  Tchaikovsky’s masterpieces. Did you know that the first time the Nutcracker was performed in America was at the SF Ballet?

 

Pink Martini at SFJazz | 201 Franklin Street

You’ve heard their playful tunes everywhere, from the lobbies of four-star hotels to movies and television. This fall, Portland-based orchestra Pink Martini brings their menthol-cool musical stylings to the SFJazz Center. “Soulful,” “sophisticated,” and “sexy” are apt descriptors for this cultish band, which combines world music, classical compositions, jazz, and pop. This is their album launch party and kick-off for Pink Martini’s world tour too, so expect to dance and sing along to music with an international flair.

 

In Conversation” at the Nourse Theater | 275 Hayes Street

The fall series at City Arts & Lectures, which reopened the Nourse Theater in 2013, places the best and brightest from the worlds of art, science, and culture in dialogue. On November 17, Marina Abramovic, perhaps the world’s most famous performance artist, discusses culture with the Bulgarian-born, Brooklyn-based blogger Maria Popova. Trevor Noah, the newly minted host of the Daily Show, stops by to chat with SF business leader Laurene Powell Jobs on November 21. Joel Cohen, Frances McDormand, and a concert by Darlene Love are all on the schedule as well.

 

San Francisco Opera | 301 Van Ness Avenue

Grab your opera glasses and head to the War Memorial Opera House to see some of the world’s greatest operas performed this fall. Verdi’s masterpiece about an Ethiopian princess kidnapped by an Egyptian soldier, Aida, gets a modern update with sets designed by LA-based graffiti artist RETNA. The visuals are likely to mix innovation and antiquity, as RETNA takes inspiration from ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics.

Fulton’s Friday Night Feasts

Brimming with farm-to-table restaurants and handcrafted cocktail bars, San Francisco is the ultimate destination for a foodie’s Friday night out. The San Francisco condos for sale at Fulton 555 are in the heart of food-friendly Hayes Valley, where you can accept some of the city’s finest cultural offerings before wining and dining to your heart’s content. Sip some local vino at nearby Birba wine bar before taking in the soulful sounds of America’s greatest art form at the internationally renowned SFJAZZ Center. Enjoy an after-show aperitif with a European-influenced victual venture at Absinthe, then a supper of local California fare at the reclaimed wood-lined New American restaurant, Rich Table.

Brimming with farm-to-table restaurants and handcrafted cocktail bars, San Francisco is the ultimate destination for a foodie’s Friday night out. The condos at Fulton 555 are in the heart of food-friendly Hayes Valley, where you can accept some of the city’s finest cultural offerings before wining and dining to your heart’s content. Sip some local vino at nearby Birba wine bar before taking in the soulful sounds of America’s greatest art form at the internationally renowned SFJAZZ Center. Enjoy an after-show aperitif with a European-influenced victual venture at Absinthe, then a supper of local California fare at the reclaimed wood-lined New American restaurant, Rich Table.

But sometimes a Friday night in is called for, and the Hayes Valley homes at Fulton 555 are the perfect place to entertain and unwind with friends. Here, the kitchens are graciously designed with the home cook in mind, whether you’ve only read a few chapters of the latest Michael Pollan or are as skilled as Alice Waters. Not only do you have built-in state-of-the-art Bosch appliances, but there is ample space to store and display your favorite chef’s gadgets—from your KitchenAid stand mixer to your Vitamix. Long hikes to the grocery store for that last-minute saffron to complete the dish will be a thing of the past—Fulton 555 has an on-site grocery store. With seasonal selections of the area’s offerings, this convenient shop makes cooking at home as simple as an elevator ride.

To celebrate the local food culture, create a San Francisco-themed evening to impress your guests. Start your meal with your favorite greens dressed in a creamy and tangy green goddess dressing. Legend has it that this sauce was developed in the 1920s when a chef at the Palace Hotel on Market Street wanted to commemorate the hit play The Green Goddess. With mayonnaise, sour cream, chives, chervil, tarragon, and lots of lemon juice, you have something that compliments any salad or can stand alone as a dip. Don’t forget to pick up some authentic San Francisco sourdough bread downstairs to make homemade croutons.

For the main course, showcase one of the Bay Area’s most considerable culinary contributions—cioppino, a seafood stew developed in the North Beach neighborhood by Genoese immigrants. The dish traditionally takes advantage of the Bay’s catch of the day—a mix of the famous Dungeness crab, clams, mussels, squid, and fish. Make this dish relentlessly local and use a Napa chardonnay as the braising liquid and serve with more sourdough bread to mop up the briny broth. If you’ve saved space for dessert, serve local favorite It’s-It ice cream sandwiches as a no-fuss end to your evening. Once you’ve finished your meal and are having a nightcap with friends on the rooftop, you’ll be happy you stayed home on this Friday.

Summer Happenings and Events

When summer trips to Tahoe and Napa start to sound more like a trek than a treat, you can beat the travel stress with a Bay Area summer staycation. Just outside the condos for sale at Fulton 555, you’ll find street parades, athletic events, and concerts to keep you feeling like a tourist in your own town—not to mention feeling like a pampered guest in the comfort of your own well-appointed San Francisco apartment. And living in one of the world’s most livable cities—from the Castro to Cow Hollow to the always-hip Hayes Valley—with its temperate weather, international flare, and long tradition of diversity, also means there’s summertime activity to suit everyone’s tastes:

When summer trips to Tahoe and Napa start to sound more like a trek than a treat, you can beat the travel stress with a Bay Area summer staycation. Just outside the condos for sale at Fulton 555, you’ll find street parades, athletic events, and concerts to keep you feeling like a tourist in your own townnot to mention feeling like a pampered guest in the comfort of your own well-appointed San Francisco apartment. And living in one of the world’s most livable citiesfrom the Castro to Cow Hollow to the always-hip Hayes Valleywith its temperate weather, international flare, and long tradition of diversity, also means there’s summertime activity to suit everyone’s tastes:

Art Galleries in Hayes Valley

Those with a penchant for art and a need for some inspiration to decorate their new Hayes Valley abode, will appreciate the myriad art options in the area: Linden Hayes Foundation houses works that showcase the natural splendor of California, while the Jules Maeght Gallery exhibits contemporary art with a European flair. Summer time is the perfect season to stroll around the neighborhood and  grab a glass of rosé at a wine bar, like Birba, before, during, and after your gallery hopping.

Summer Concerts and Comedy

While the national presidential conventions are taking place in Philadelphia and Cleveland this summer,  the home of one of the first modern conventions, Bill Graham Civic Auditorium  (formerly San Francisco Auditorium), is hosting edgy comedy and classic jam bands all summer long. This Beaux-art gem was built in 1915 for the Panama-Pacific Exposition, and since then has hosted concerts from Lady Gaga to the Grateful Dead. This summer, catch alt-comedy hero Louis CK and musical improvisation masterminds Phish at this historic arena.

People in Plazas | Every Monday-Friday, July-Sept

Need a break in the middle of the work day? On Mondays during lunch, head to any public square in Hayes Valley and get swept up in the cavalcade of outdoor art and music during People in Plazas, a city-wide celebration of street arts. Performers take center stage—or center plaza, as the case may be—during this annual summertime celebration. It’s a perfect respite from the hustle and bustle of your work day. From hula dancers to Berkeley-trained musicians, watching a world-class artist perform while you nosh on your salad from Morty’s Delicatessen makes lunch even more enjoyable.

San Francisco Marathon | July 31

Stretch your calves and get ready to brave the hills with 26,000 other runners during the San Francisco Marathon. The waterfront views on this journey will take away whatever breath you have left, as you jog across the Golden Gate Bridge and past landmarks like the Ferry Building and Coit Tower. You might be tempted to make a quick detour to Fulton 555, as the marathon passes just south of Hayes Valley. If a 26-plus-mile run through neighborhoods like Haight-Ashbury and the Mission isn’t the perfect-sized stretch, you can sign up for the half marathon or join world-class athletes for the Ultramarathon—a regular marathon times two (all three events take place on the same day).

Nihonmachi Street Fair | August 6-7

With vibrant neighborhoods like Japantown and Chinatownthe largest outside of Asia and the oldest in North AmericaSan Francisco’s multicultural heritage and diversity are always on vivid display. Just a 15-minute walk from your Hayes Valley apartment, the Nihonmachi Street Fair, established in 1973, celebrates this cross-cultural medley with music and food from Asian-Pacific regions and the rest of the world. Listen to bluegrass while nibbling on Vietnamese BBQ from SF favorite Bombzie’s or bite into a juicy piece of Kokio Republic’s Korean fried chicken and then dance to reggae.

Brand New SFMOMA

Residents of the Hayes Valley condos at Fulton 555 now find themselves less than two miles from a nearly peerless art institution: on May 14th, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art reopened its doors and immediately became the largest contemporary art museum in the country. After being closed for nearly three years for an ambitious $305 million expansion that almost tripled the museum’s gallery and exhibition space, the acclaimed institution now finds itself on another level entirely. According to the San Francisco Chronicle, the brand new SFMOMA contains an astonishing 4,000 additional works.

Residents of the Hayes Valley condos at Fulton 555 now find themselves less than two miles from a nearly peerless art institution: on May 14th, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art reopened its doors and immediately became the largest contemporary art museum in the country. After being closed for nearly three years for an ambitious $305 million expansion that almost tripled the museum’s gallery and exhibition space, the acclaimed institution now finds itself on another level entirely. According to the San Francisco Chronicle, the brand new SFMOMA contains an astonishing 4,000 additional works.

The new SFMOMA was designed by an international architecture firm, Snøhetta, that created an exterior ten-story addition that is as bright, luminous, and wave-like as stacked white paper, and complements the Mario Botta-designed building that sits behind it. Just as the Guggenheim Museum in New York City exudes a level of artistry on par with its interior holdings, the new SFMOMA’s physical structure is an impressive and vibrant creation in itself.

Meanwhile, the new interior is enormous and wildly diverse. There are 19 exhibitions running currently, including “Pop, Minimal, and Figurative Art,” a part of the ever-expanding Fisher Collection that highlights work from Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Sol LeWitt, and Chuck Close, among others. There’s also “The Campaign for Art: Modern and Contemporary,” which features paintings by Jackson Pollock and Jasper Johns and stunning photographs by Diane Arbus. Exhibitions on the modernist painter Paul Klee, the innovative sculptor Alexander Calder, and the textile artist Claudy Jongstra are also currently on view. Moreover, the museum hosts regular spotlight conversations about various icons throughout the summer: these 20- to 30-minute sessions will cover Andy Warhol, Alexander Calder, Mark Rothko, Diane Arbus, and Ellsworth Kelly. Check their website for more details.

The SFMOMA’s grand reopening is the perfect symbol of its city’s creative impulses: a constantly evolving mix of old and new, the traditional and the avant-garde, and the canonical and the revolutionary that can’t help but inspire anyone who visits.

San Francisco Pride 2016

Given recent tragic events, the Pride celebrations currently taking place across the country have become even more important as representations and embodiments of the LGBT community’s history, steadfastness, joy, and, perhaps most importantly, its refusal to be silenced. They are life-affirming meeting grounds for members of the LGBT community, their families, friends, and other allies who support them.

Given recent tragic events, the Pride celebrations currently taking place across the country have become even more important as representations and embodiments of the LGBT community’s history, steadfastness, joy, and, perhaps most importantly, its refusal to be silenced. They are life-affirming meeting grounds for members of the LGBT community, their families, friends, and other allies who support them.

The San Francisco Pride festival means a lot of different things to a lot of different people. For some, the event is a weekend of unencumbered celebration—of the movement itself, of the people within it, and of the city that nurtured its existence for decades. Others see the weekend as the ideal time and venue to advocate for change. And many attendees and participants do a bit of both. While many attendees of SF Pride may agree that society has come a long way in its treatment of the LGBT community, they also know that there’s still much work to be done.

This colorful intersection of vital social activism and soul-enriching celebration means that SF Pride embraces, confronts, and commemorates its communities’ complex histories—often simultaneously. This year’s theme is racial and economic justice, so the weekend will function as equal parts party and political platform.

This year, SF Pride takes place on June 25th and 26th, but in the run-up to the festival there are myriad events that span the cultural and societal gamut. Friday events include San Francisco’s largest transgender community event, the Trans March in Mission Dolores Park; the Shenanigans Pride: Mask4Mask Masquerade Ball; the always interesting EDEN Friday’s Paint Party; the SF Gay Pride Sunset Cruise; and there is a whole weekend of wild Colossus Hot Pink! parties.

The official festivities kick off with a dance and music festival in the Civic Center from 12 pm to 6 pm on Saturday, where 20 stages will be set up to host a vast array of local performers. Sunday begins with the main event, the massive parade that runs down Market Street and ends at the Civic Center, in which more than 200 contingents from across the Bay Area will be participating. From advocacy and parental groups, to motorcycle clubs, religious organizations, politicians, and nearly everyone in between, the entire San Francisco spectrum will be thoroughly represented.

The parade culminates with another fabulous musical celebration at the Civic Center, where the main stage will host an as-yet-unannounced headlining performer. Prior years have seen this stage graced by an amazing and eclectic set of performers, including Lady Gaga, En Vogue, Joan Baez, the Backstreet Boys, Margaret Cho, Erasure, Chaka Khan, Solange Knowles, Lisa Lisa, Third Eye Blind, Crystal Waters, and The Weather Girls.

As always, expect San Francisco Pride to be a wonderfully dynamic weekend fueled by strength, community, self-expression, and love!

 

A Pet Lover’s Guide to Hayes Valley

Spend a day strolling through Hayes Valley, and you won’t be surprised to learn that the oft-repeated line that dogs outnumber children in San Francisco is actually true. With its pet-friendly laws, ample off-leash parks, and dedicated pet resorts and hotels, the City by the Bay is a mecca for canines, cats, and their human companions (not to mention the city’s fish, birds, reptiles, and small mammals). Residents of the Fulton 555 condos in San Francisco have a private dog park in the building, and they also have easy access to some of Hayes Valley’s best animal care resources so that they can go about the day-to-day business of proud pet-parenthood.

Spend a day strolling through Hayes Valley, and you won’t be surprised to learn that the oft-repeated line that dogs outnumber children in San Francisco is actually true. With its pet-friendly laws, ample off-leash parks, and dedicated pet resorts and hotels, the City by the Bay is a mecca for canines, cats, and their human companions (not to mention the city’s fish, birds, reptiles, and small mammals). Residents of the Fulton 555 condos in San Francisco have a private dog park in the building, and they also have easy access to some of Hayes Valley’s best animal care resources so that they can go about the day-to-day business of proud pet-parenthood.

Patricia’s Green | Octavia Boulevard and Fell Street

Letting the dog out is easy with the on-site dog run at the Fulton 555 condos, but just steps away, you’ll find Patricia’s Green, a park with an enclosed dog area with grassy pastures and ample opportunities for meet and greets with other neighborhood dogs. This tidy, little green space in the heart of Hayes Valley also hosts a rotating installation of public sculptures. Grab a Ritual coffee or ice cream from Smitten at the nearby Proxy—a pop-up bazaar of food, drink, and retail constructed out of repurposed shipping containers—and you and your pet can both appreciate the pleasure of taking a break.

Blue Cross Pet Hospital | 1386 Golden Gate Avenue

Near Fulton 555, this Alamo Square office offers full-service veterinary care for local animals, including regular exams, spaying/neutering, teeth cleaning, vaccinations, and surgeries. For cats and dogs requiring longer stays, Blue Cross also offers the option of overnight boarding. With photos of four-legged patients filling the waiting room, this practice, which has been operating continuously on the site since the 1920s, feels much more like a small-town veterinarian service. One of Blue Cross’s vets, San Francisco native Dr. Sherman Wong, has been at the practice since 1975 and often brings his pug Buddy to work.

Pet Food Express | 1975 Market Street

Not surprisingly, Pet Food Express does indeed sell victuals for all types of critters, but this Market Street store is also a convenient clearinghouse for every conceivable pet owner need—from the first step of adopting a pet onsite and purchasing food, toys, collars, and leashes, to taking advantage of the services from their pet washing stations and the VIP Wellness Center’s veterinary care, vaccinations, and eye, ear, and nail care. Picking up 50 pounds of gourmet cat food for your Maine Coon? There’s parking on-site, as well as same-day delivery if you’d prefer to leave the heavy lifting to someone else.

The Dog Barber | 1903 Market Street

Let Roberto Lopez, aka The Dog Barber, and his full-service salon give your pup the star treatment, including a full brushing of your pet’s coat, with a bath, blow dry, and nail trim. The full-service package includes ear cleaning and haircut. Committed to the welfare of all animals, owner Roberto has volunteered at the San Francisco SPCA as a walker and an animal attendant, in addition to honing his craft working with the city’s better dog-grooming shops and attending industry conferences and workshops.
Lastly, there’s no need for a doggy bag at these local pet-friendly establishments that allow well-behaved canine companions to join their owners for a meal or a drink. Check out Biergarten (424 Octavia Street), Absinthe (398 Hayes Street), Cafe La Vie (514 Octavia Street), and plenty more nearby.

Where to Get Your Culture Fix Near Fulton 555

Perfect as your Fulton 555 condo is, you'll probably want to leave it every now and then. Fortunately, your home in Hayes Valley has access to many great cultural institutions and is particularly close to three excellent centers of music and dance: the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, the War Memorial Opera House, and the San Francisco Ballet. People from all over the city (and the country!) flock to Hayes Valley to experience the diverse programming of these renowned institutions, but residents of Fulton 555 can enjoy them year-round and at a moment’s notice.

Perfect as your Fulton 555 condo is, you’ll probably want to leave it every now and then. Fortunately, your home in Hayes Valley has access to many great cultural institutions and is particularly close to three excellent centers of music and dance: the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, the War Memorial Opera House, and the San Francisco Ballet. People from all over the city (and the country!) flock to Hayes Valley to experience the diverse programming of these renowned institutions, but residents of Fulton 555 can enjoy them year-round and at a moment’s notice.

San Francisco Conservatory of Music

Although its primary objective is to school hundreds of students in the intricacies of classical music, this prolific conservatory also presents approximately 500 concerts a year. Whether you’re a classical music connoisseur or you’re simply looking to tune your ear to some Dvorak, this is the perfect place to watch the talent of tomorrow as they perform everything from chamber music to full-blown operas like the recent performance of Così Fan Tutte. And if the show makes you want to pick up your long-abandoned guitar or learn a new instrument, you can sign up for a class in the Adult Extension Division.

War Memorial Opera House

Things get exciting here even before you’ve walked in the door: the first municipally owned opera house in the United States is located in a gorgeous Beaux Arts building that was built especially for it in 1932. Even if you don’t make it to a show, the entrance hall, with its enormous coffered ceiling, is a performance in itself. But the architecture pales in comparison to the operas staged inside; we recommend Bizet’s classic Carmen, which will unfold beneath the Opera House’s elegant proscenium arch in May 2016.

San Francisco Ballet

Superlative ballet companies aren’t born overnight; just ask Helgi Tomasson, who has been artistic director at the San Francisco Ballet for over 30 years. In that time, he’s transformed it from a regional troupe into an internationally respected company, although there’s no better place to catch them than on their home turf. The 2016 repertory season has already started magnificently, featuring lauded productions of Swan Lake and a double bill of Dances at a Gathering and Swimmer. There’s plenty more inspiring ballet to come; browse the calendar now and book early.  

PROXY: cultural curiosities in art, food, retail and events

In the San Francisco Bay Area, it’s not uncommon to see cargo ships plying their routes in and out of the Bay, their stacks of colorful corrugated metal containers filled with goods for trans-Pacific travel. But what happens to these big metal boxes once they’re no longer needed for shipping freight?

In the San Francisco Bay Area, it’s not uncommon to see cargo ships plying their routes in and out of the Bay, their stacks of colorful corrugated metal containers filled with goods for trans-Pacific travel. But what happens to these big metal boxes once they’re no longer needed for shipping freight?

Increasingly, forward-thinking designers are recognizing that the humble shipping container is just as versatile and useful on land as at sea. Just steps from the Hayes Valley condos at Fulton 555, a unique example of “cargotecture” called PROXY showcases the potential of repurposed containers. PROXY has given some of these containers, and the formerly vacant lot on which they sit, a second life as a modular urban marketplace featuring a diverse collection of dining, cultural, and retail options.

At PROXY, which stretches along Octavia Street between Hayes and Fell Streets, the dining and drinking options include Smitten Ice Cream, Ritual Roasters, Juice Shop and other popular businesses that serve straight from their converted container kitchens. Another favorite, Biergarten, takes advantage of available open space to serve its beers Bavarian style – that is, outdoors – from taps housed inside a container.

Boasting a central event space for live music productions and outdoor movie screenings, PROXY has hosted numerous film festivals and film-related programming as a noted contributor to the Hayes Valley cinema scene. Meanwhile, pop-up galleries at PROXY provide local artists with valuable opportunities to display and sell their work and get their names known in the community.

Catering to the active lifestyle of San Franciscans, PROXY also offers Basic Training, a fitness facility with personal training and group fitness classes that are open to the public. Housed in a container nearby, Streets of San Francisco leads unique bicycle tours that allow even locals to get off the beaten track and explore their city. For all these adventures, you’re going to need some stylishly designed technical wear, of course. For this, Aether Apparel, one of PROXY’s key retail tenants, has you covered from head to toe.

By placing empty shipping containers on a vacant, city-owned lot in the middle of Hayes Valley, envelope A+D has united two often overlooked (and sometimes abandoned) leftovers of modern urban existence to create PROXY, a community space that celebrates culture, reinvention, and the unique dynamics that make city life so compelling.

No Connection Between Artist’s Mural and Hayes Valley Condo Project

A portion of a Linden Alley mural painted by San Francisco artist Zio Ziegler was inadvertently included as background in a photograph used on advertising banners and promotional material for the new condo project at 555 Fulton Street but did not signify his endorsement of the project. At Zeigler’s request, the photograph has been removed from materials promoting the project.

A portion of a Linden Alley mural painted by San Francisco artist Zio Ziegler was inadvertently included as background in a photograph used on advertising banners and promotional material for the new condo project at 555 Fulton Street but did not signify his endorsement of the project. At Zeigler’s request, the photograph has been removed from materials promoting the project.

Hayes Valley: A Family Affair

Hayes Valley, an area known for its wealth of stellar restaurants and cultural offerings, is also a remarkably family-friendly neighborhood. In some areas that are steeped in high-end options, youth activities can sometimes take a backseat. But the opposite is true in Hayes Valley, where thriving arts and culinary scenes embrace all ages with an array of youth programs and family events.

Hayes Valley, an area known for its wealth of stellar restaurants and cultural offerings, is also a remarkably family-friendly neighborhood. In some areas that are steeped in high-end options, youth activities can sometimes take a backseat. But the opposite is true in Hayes Valley, where thriving arts and culinary scenes embrace all ages with an array of youth programs and family events. Residents of the new Hayes Valley condos at Fulton 555 live right around the corner from innovative centers of education, vibrant and interactive art pieces, beautiful parks, and (perhaps most importantly) great ice cream.

The Open Air

Koshland Playground and Learning Garden
Koshland is far more than your typical playground. Sure it has contraptions for climbing and tires for swinging as well as a place to shoot hoops, but what distinguishes Koshland is its stunning garden. The large and lush green space consists of 54 plots (18 of which are designated exclusively for educational use) and is open every day. When the entire expanse is blooming, it functions as a breathtaking natural marvel in the middle of the city. Kids and adults can stroll through the garden, breathe in the fresh air, and take in a lesson about how fresh food and flowers are grown.

Patricia’s Green
Patricia’s Green is not the city’s largest park, but what it lacks in size it more than makes up for in character. A small playground and grassy areas provide ample space for picnics or a simple spot to lay down a blanket and relax with a book while the kids run around a bit. A myriad of shops and restaurants surround the park, so a great cup of coffee or an ice cream cone is only a stone’s throw away from a foray in nature. Named after neighborhood activist and Hayes Valley hero Patricia Walkup, the park also features revolving and permanent art installations including the gorgeous, interactive Temple by internationally renowned sculptor David Best. Temple is, unsurprisingly, a temple: a massive, intricate, wooden structure designed to be interactive. Visitors are invited to draw directly on its surface and help make the piece a collaborative entity. In this way, Temple perfectly embodies its neighborhood’s appeal as a stunning, world-class creation that captivates children and adults alike.

Heading Indoors

Seesaw Studio
The Seesaw Studio offers some of the most unique and fascinating classes for children in all of San Francisco. Categorized as a “well-being studio,” Seesaw doesn’t just impart learning skills and knowledge to children; it nurtures a therapeutic approach to learning and growing. The studio provides opportunities for parents to learn alongside their children, and family consultations are available as well. Seesaw teaches children to be more comfortable in their own skin and to recognize their strengths through development classes and therapy sessions. Innovative music classes as well as French, Japanese, Mandarin, and sign language courses are also offered.

Fiddlesticks
Fiddlesticks is a vibrant little boutique that stocks an array of kids’ clothing, educational toys, books, and knickknacks. It’s a charming little shop run by an impossibly knowledgeable and friendly staff. Everyone at Fiddlesticks takes the role educational toys can play in a child’s development very seriously, and the store selection reflects this focused dedication to education and fun.

We All Scream for…Molecular Gastronomy

Smitten Ice Cream
This place is not only an ice cream shop, it’s a scientific marvel. Never heard of made-to-order ice cream? Then Smitten Ice Cream will change everything you know about ice cream technology. Smitten founder Robyn Sue Fisher developed the Brrr machine, which uses liquid nitrogen to make fresh, irresistibly creamy ice cream in a matter of seconds. Best of all, the Smitten technique is not a gimmick. The result is ice cream that’s more fresh than any you’ve ever tasted with a certain velvety texture unlike any other. Come for the ice cream, stay for the science lesson.

 

The Top Destinations In Hayes Valley To Watch Super Bowl 50

With just a few weeks left before the kickoff of Super Bowl 50, for many fans the big question is not yet which team will win, but rather, where will they go to watch the big game. Lucky for San Francisco residents, this year the Super Bowl is in our backyard, and the event committee is promising a game that’s “loud, proud, inclusive and authentic, just like the Bay Area itself.”

With just a few weeks left before the kickoff of Super Bowl 50, for many fans the big question is not yet which team will win, but rather, where will they go to watch the big game. Lucky for San Francisco residents, this year the Super Bowl is in our backyard, and the event committee is promising a game that’s “loud, proud, inclusive and authentic, just like the Bay Area itself.” This Super Bowl Sunday, there’s no doubt that practically every bar in San Francisco will be screening the game regardless of whether they usually cater to a sports crowd or not, so it comes down to a matter of preference in choosing which destination is best suited for you. While it may be tempting to head downtown to watch the game at Super Bowl City, traffic snarls, crowds, and security checkpoints mean more hassle than convenience for residents of the city. This year, Super Bowl City will be open to the public starting January 30th, giving locals the chance to enjoy the festivities before the out-of-town crowd arrives. But come game day, dropping by a local bar means you can and relax and catch all the action with your friends or family, alongside local sports fans of all stripes, without ever leaving the neighborhood. Here are some of the best spots to watch the big game in or around the Hayes Valley condos for sale at 555 Fulton.

The Dobbs Bar | 409 Gough Street
Neighborhood go-to The Dobbs Bar, (an extension of the popular Dobbs Ferry restaurant) is a great option conveniently located at the corner of Gough and Hayes streets. Its name and decor may be inspired by the owner’s birthplace in Dobbs Ferry, a small town in upstate New York, but this intimate neighborhood spot is quintessentially Californian with friendly clientele and an upscale menu of gourmet bar fare. There’s plenty of screens for catching every play, and a full bar including local wines and beers

The Original Tommy’s Joynt | 1101 Geary Boulevard
Another spot loved by locals is The Original Tommy’s Joynt, a watering hole only a few blocks outside of Hayes Valley. Tommy’s Joynt has been serving a wide selection of suds and home-cooked food since 1947. Super Bowl Sunday is an annual tradition in the US, and here you can watch football over generous portions of American standbys like hand-carved BBQ brisket, turkey legs, or spaghetti and meatballs. This classic, kitschy bar prides itself on its no-frills approach: just friendly service, unique atmosphere, and fiercely loyal regulars.

Hi Tops | 2247 Market Street
Residents of Hayes Valley know that living in this central neighborhood means you’re never more than a short walk from another one of San Francisco’s unique mini districts. Head down Market Street, on Hayes Valley’s southern border, and in just a few blocks you’ll soon find yourself in The Castro, the center of gay life in San Francisco. Hi Tops is a relatively new establishment in this historic neighborhood, and it opened in 2012 as the city’s first gay sports bar. The bar is packed with sports fans on any given day, so plan to get there early on Super Bowl Sunday, as this favorite sports spot is sure to get crowded with locals looking to watch the game over drinks and Hi Tops’ classic pub grub.

Churchill | 198 Church Street
And just around the corner from Fulton 555 is Churchill, one of San Francisco’s hippest and classiest drinking establishments, only a stone’s throw from the heart of Hayes Valley. This upscale bar only has a few TVs, but you can bet they’ll be tuned to the Super Bowl come February 7. Meticulously crafted drinks are the specialty at this establishment, where the décor melds industrial chic with traditionally masculine trappings of a bygone era. While athletes clash and vie for dominance on the football field, the flavors in your cocktails are sure to blend harmoniously; each one made with unique ingredients that change with the season.

If you’d prefer to scrap the playbook and wait until game day to choose your Super Bowl spot, Hayes Valley has plenty more neighborhood options to drop by and soak up the local vibe. Long-time San Franciscans as well as those who will soon call Fulton 555 their home can appreciate the city for its seemingly endless selection of venues to eat, drink, and enjoy the excitement of the game away from the crowds and chaos of Super Bowl City. These Hayes Valley condos are conveniently located near a dozen diverse bars that will definitely be tuned to the game on Super Bowl Sunday including Sugar Café, Brass Tacks, Smuggler’s Cove, Biergarten and Pause Wine Bar.

 

 

 

 

Holiday Shopping in Hayes Valley

San Francisco is an absolutely perfect backdrop for celebrating the holidays: no snowstorms will blow through, and yet the air is brisk enough for warm winter mittens and hats, adding to the holiday shopping atmosphere. While the Hayes Valley condos for sale at Fulton 555 offer future residents the comfort and spark of their unique neighborhood, all San Franciscans alike are drawn to the area at this time of year for some holiday cheer. Here are a few unparalleled highlights to enjoy when seeking holiday pleasure in Hayes Valley this season.

San Francisco is an absolutely perfect backdrop for celebrating the holidays: no snowstorms will blow through, and yet the air is brisk enough for warm winter mittens and hats, adding to the holiday shopping atmosphere. While the Hayes Valley condos for sale at Fulton 555 offer future residents the comfort and spark of their unique neighborhood, all San Franciscans alike are drawn to the area at this time of year for some holiday cheer. Here are a few unparalleled highlights to enjoy when seeking holiday pleasure in Hayes Valley this season.

PROXY

A temporary two-block retail project, PROXY is situated at the heart of Hayes Valley. The motivation behind the shipping container project was to mobilize a flexible environment for art, culture, retail, and food. A true transformation to the urban evolution of San Francisco, it has become a central focus of the Hayes Valley neighborhood. During this holiday season, PROXY options include shopping for outdoor apparel gifts at Aether Apparel, a personal coffee cupping at Ritual Coffee Roasters, or a bike tour of the city for yourself or a loved one hosted by Streets of San Francisco Bike Tours.

Timbuk2

By all qualifications, Timbuk2 is a true representation of San Francisco. The company was founded by a bike messenger in his garage in 1989, and since then has continued to evolve seamlessly. All bags are still locally made in the Mission District, and each is hand sewn and made to order. Their customizable messenger bag line as well as other useful items from luggage to laptop bags are stamped with their legendary quality and craftsmanship and come with a lifetime guarantee. This is the perfect place in your Hayes Valley neighborhood to buy gifts with customizable options, fitting the bill for everyone you would want to gift this year.

Rand + Statler

What says happy holidays better than a high-end modern piece of clothing or accessory? Rand + Statler, a famed boutique located on Hayes Street, has been named by Zagat as one of the “sexiest shops” to explore this holiday season. The boutique draws magnetic attraction from the fashion-forward residents of San Francisco. With a desirable and luring environment, it provides a great neighborhood destination for holiday shopping that allows you to truly express how much your friends and family mean to you.

Steven Alan

A San Francisco favorite since 2011, the Steven Alan location in Hayes Valley is full of fashion and shoppers year-round. In the spirit of the holidays, designer Steven Alan has a variety of men’s and women’s casual apparel on sale. The store is bubbling with critically acclaimed collections for the hip consumer, and its offerings are sure to add a complement of chic fashion to the wardrobe of anyone for whom you’re shopping this year.

The retail outlets that fill the streets of Hayes Valley are boundless and without equal for holiday shopping and enjoyment this winter season. Whether you plan to make Fulton 555 your future home or are simply a Hayes Valley enthusiast at heart, the neighborhood will not disappoint when it comes to your holiday shopping adventures.

Materials mastery

San Francisco is a city like no other. Part of its unique charm derives from the rich blend of old and new architecture, as stately and ornate Victorians perched on the city’s steepest hillsides rub shoulders with stunning modern buildings housing some of San Francisco’s most desirable residences. As the city experiences a 21st-century growth spurt, its neighborhoods are seeing new developments in a range of architectural styles. But buildings don’t stand alone, and any successful project should seek to find harmony with its surroundings, whether old, new, or a blend of the two.

San Francisco is a city like no other. Part of its unique charm derives from the rich blend of old and new architecture, as stately and ornate Victorians perched on the city’s steepest hillsides rub shoulders with stunning modern buildings housing some of San Francisco’s most desirable residences. As the city experiences a 21st-century growth spurt, its neighborhoods are seeing new developments in a range of architectural styles. But buildings don’t stand alone, and any successful project should seek to find harmony with its surroundings, whether old, new, or a blend of the two.

Fulton 555 offers a collection of contemporary condominium residences in Hayes Valley, one of San Francisco’s hottest neighborhoods in a centrally located district filled with vibrant energy and creativity. As the flagship development in Hayes Valley, Fulton 555 strives to create a real sense of place, an intimate neighborhood within a neighborhood.

Architects Ian Birchall and Associates designed the Hayes Valley condos at Fulton 555 responsibly by first taking into consideration the existing architectural landscape and the needs of local residents. What makes a neighborhood a neighborhood? Is it a comfortable and familiar place to come home to? Is it an urban area with a distinct look and feel? Is it a place where one can find all of life’s necessities within a few square blocks? Is it a place in which to relax and take refuge from the rigors of the day? Is it a fun place to explore, whether by running into friends or running errands? Fulton 555 brings all these desirable aspects of neighborhood living to Hayes Valley. Because of its conscientious design, Fulton 555 also fits seamlessly into its surroundings while providing the luxury residences and amenities that make urban living both enjoyable and inspiring.

Fulton 555 was also designed with a contemporary aesthetic befitting Hayes Valley’s creatives, designers, and tech industry innovators. Working with the Hayes Valley Neighborhood Association, Ian Birchall and Associates revised a previous design for the luxury residential building to come up with an improved plan that would elevate the function as well as the look of its neighborhood.

This new design features a relief façade in alternating panels of textured and clear glass that maximize privacy while welcoming in the San Francisco sunlight. This custom-designed glass skin adds a dimensional texture to the façade of Fulton 555 and gives a subtle nod to the bay windows so prominent in the city’s famous Victorians. Inside Fulton 555, handsomely appointed residences blend careful craftsmanship with modern conveniences via hardwood flooring, sleek countertops, stainless steel surfaces, and premium appliances.

But Fulton 555 doesn’t stop there—after listening to locals to determine what amenities would make this Hayes Valley development an integral part of the community, Ian Birchall and Associates expanded their plan to include a dog park, an on-site grocery store, and a bike shop to serve the surrounding neighborhood as well as underground parking and meeting spaces.

Hayes Valley is the crossroads of San Francisco. Once a literal crossroads intersected by the freeway, the intimate neighborhood now flourishes as a hub linking its city’s creative, culinary, and civic districts. Within Hayes Valley, Fulton 555 offers luxury condos housed in an innovative setting while providing additional infrastructure, public space, and distinctive architecture to the center of a vibrant neighborhood.

Gallery Guide | Top Three Art Exhibits Near Hayes Valley this Fall and Winter

Never shy when it comes to culture, San Francisco’s fall/winter schedules are awash with compelling art exhibitions. Here, we pick out three of the best. And you won't have to travel far from Hayes Valley to get to them.

Never shy when it comes to culture, San Francisco’s fall/winter schedules are awash with compelling art exhibitions. Here, we pick out three of the best. And you won’t have to travel far from Hayes Valley to get to them.

Looking Back: 45 Years @ John Berggruen Gallery
Nostalgia is the theme of John Berggruen Gallery’s current exhibition, although nostalgia is rarely this hip. Until November 25th, the gallery celebrates everything it’s achieved during almost half a century in the business. Any movement in 20th- and 21st-century Modernism is represented here, from Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art to Bay Area Figurative. Featured artists include Alexander Calder, Joseph Cornell, Willem de Kooning, Mark di Suvero, Richard Diebenkorn, Sam Francis, Helen Frankenthaler, Philip Guston, Frida Kahlo, Franz Kline, Roy Lichtenstein, and Georgia O’Keeffe. Looking Back is a blockbuster show by all accounts, and an accessible one at that.

Sophie Calle @ Fraenkel Gallery
Love, violence, secrets, and death are all subjects ripe for exploring for Sophie Calle, an artist unafraid to court controversy. An exhibition of her work at the photography-focused Fraenkel Gallery until December 24th ventures beyond photography alone. Calle’s wry pieces include “Cash Machine,” created from ATM video surveillance footage, and “Collateral Damage, Targets,” a series of images of petty criminals’ mugshots used for police target practice. The more loved-up side of the exhibition features two working safes in which couples are invited to stash their secrets. A contract above the safes stipulates how Calle will ensure these mysteries will remain secured.

Looking East @ Asian Art Museum
Until February 7th, San Francisco’s Asian Art Gallery – a stone’s throw from Hayes Valley – is turning its attentions eastward. Looking East delves into the craze for all things Japanese, a mania that struck the West after Japan opened its trade port in the 1850s. During an explosive time in arts communities, designers and artists such as Vincent van Gogh, Mary Cassatt, Edgar Degas, Paul Gauguin, and Claude Monet were caught up in the whirlwind. This exhibition contains more than 170 objects that would inspire Western masters, from “Suido Bridge and Surugadai” by Utagawa Hiroshige to embroidered dressing gowns from the turn of the century. The derivative Western works such as “Maternal Caress (Caresse maternelle)” by Cassatt are on display as well. Beautifully curated and engrossing from start to finish, Looking East may very well inspire others to create masterpieces, too.

 

 

Fall Exhibitions and Events at the Asian Art Museum

Opened in 1966 and containing more than 18,000 works of art (in just the permanent collection), San Francisco’s Asian Art Museum is a must-visit. If you’re fortunate enough to live nearby in a Hayes Valley luxury condo, the museum has a frequently changing series of exhibitions and events, meaning you’ll want to visit again and again. Here’s what’s coming up this fall.

Opened in 1966 and containing more than 18,000 works of art (in just the permanent collection), San Francisco’s Asian Art Museum is a must-visit. If you’re fortunate enough to live nearby in a Hayes Valley luxury condo, the museum has a frequently changing series of exhibitions and events, meaning you’ll want to visit again and again. Here’s what’s coming up this fall.

Exhibitions

Exquisite Nature: 20 Masterpieces of Chinese Painting
The most influential painters from 14th-century to 18th-century China are celebrated in this impressive collection of works focused on nature. A variety of landscapes as well as paintings of country life and exquisitely detailed works that fall into the birds-and-flowers category of Chinese painting fill this exhibition with impressive examples of the importance of nature to Chinese artists. (Until 1 November)

Woven Luxuries: Indian, Persian, and Turkish Velvets
Marvel at rare textiles crafted centuries ago, including 17th-century carpets from India and Iran of incredible sizes and quality, at Woven Luxuries. Learn why countries such as Persia and Turkey became so renowned for their high-quality materials that their rugs and other textiles were often exchanged as diplomatic gifts. The only thing that will disappoint: the fact that you can’t take any of the treasures on display home to furnish your own condo. (Until 1 November)

Looking East: How Japan Inspired Monet, Van Gogh and Other Western Artists
Many artists are so influential in their own right, it’s easy to forget they were also inspired by their forebears. Looking East explores in fascinating detail how, when Japan re-opened to expanded international trade in the 1850s, a wave of prints and objects from the Land of the Rising Sun were sent to Europe and America, changing Western art forever. A total of 170 works are compared and contrasted in this extensive exhibition. (30 October 2015-7 February 2016)

Events

Attend a talk
The Asian Art Museum is flush with talks and lectures. This fall, listen as Dr. Helen Burnham from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston speaks about the role of women as both subjects and artists during the West’s period of falling in love with Japanese art (30 October), or attend a discussion by Dr. Timon Screech from the University of London’s School of Oriental and African Studies on the Japanese art of the “floating world” otherwise known as ukiyo-e. (7 November)  

Bring the family
The Asian Art Museum is a fantastic place to take the kids and allow them to get their creative juices flowing. Children between three and six years of age can explore shapes, colors, and textures throughout the museum with special Animal Adventure Art Cards, and kids aged seven to ten can take part in special 30-minute museum tours for families on Saturdays.

Take some tea
Plan ahead by registering for a “Talk & Tea” following your tour of one of the museum’s impressive exhibitions. Join other museum guests in the Fisher Room, where you’ll be plied with tea and treats and invited to take part in a discussion of what you’ve just seen. There couldn’t be a more sophisticated way to debrief. (Various dates)

Partake in yoga
At the Asian Art Museum, yoga is considered yet another artistic endeavor that is welcome within its walls. Bring along a mat and some comfortable exercise clothes and get ready to explore movement and meditation with yogini Lorna Reed. (First Sunday of each month)

For more information on events or exhibitions at the Asian Art Museum, visit http://www.asianart.org/.

 

A Green Approach to Creating Community

In Hayes Valley, San Francisco, you can expect to find art galleries and nightlife as well as a mix of boutiques and restaurants to please every taste. Adding to the allure is an emphasis on green design—public parks and markets that bring people together outdoors and act as vibrant focal points in the community.

In Hayes Valley, San Francisco, you can expect to find art galleries and nightlife as well as a mix of boutiques and restaurants to please every taste. Adding to the allure is an emphasis on green design—public parks and markets that bring people together outdoors and act as vibrant focal points in the community. According to Stefan Hastrup, principal of the architecture firm Turnbull Griffin Haesloop, green design in Hayes Valley began with demolishing the old freeway. The area was then rezoned, enhancing it as a pedestrian- and bicycle-oriented place to live. “That’s huge for green design,” Hastrup says. “You can have density without overwhelming the neighborhood with cars. People in San Francisco can choose a neighborhood where it’s actually possible to live car-free.” Hayes Valley soon also became replete with dynamic streetscapes that enhanced the neighborhood’s sense of identity and pride.

One such streetscape is PROXY, a gathering spot that has the feel of an outdoor festival. Here, shipping containers are used as temporary structures to house an array of shops and vendors. One can stop by Streets of San Francisco Bike Tours and embark on an adventure, or pop over to Ritual Coffee Roasters for a fresh brew. For meeting up with friends or a relaxed first date, try Biergarten, which offers locally sourced food and German beer. Regardless of your mood, there is always something at PROXY to experience.

“It’s a real draw,” says Hastrup. “You’re not in a store or restaurant, you’re outdoors. It allows for a lot of fun gatherings to take place. If you have a neighborhood spot to go to like that, you feel like the city in a sense is your living room. You can expand your sense of home to your whole neighborhood.” Another spot that conjures a sense of home is Patricia’s Green, a local park named for Patricia Walkup, a late community activist who advocated for more open space. While the play area is a popular draw for children, adults are attracted by the rotating art installations. Currently, the park is home to The Temple at Patricia’s Green, a work of art by David Best. Constructed out of wood, the unique piece honors community and invites people to write notes to their loved ones on its walls.

Works of art ranging from apparel and jewelry to furniture and decor are on display twice a year in Hayes Valley at the Urban Air Market, the most expansive al fresco design festival in the country. More than 100 local designers and vendors are selected to showcase their wares based in part on their dedication to sustainable design, which takes environmental impact into account. “[Urban Air Market is] filled with jewelry makers, clothing makers, people who work in textiles, so there are products there you wouldn’t find elsewhere,” Hastrup says. “It’s completely different from going to a chain store and buying a generic product—it’s like Etsy, but in person.” One of the goals of the market is to contribute to a sense of community by connecting environmentally conscious artisans with local shoppers searching for sustainable products.

While some Hayes Valley condos like Fulton 555 invite residents to create community by getting together outdoors on a private rooftop terrace, it’s also possible to turn the interior of your Hayes Valley apartment into a gathering place that celebrates your home’s unique locale. At the Hayes Valley home design store Maker & Moss, browse through a variety of items featuring details found in nature as well as handcrafted finds from local artists. Hand-painted tableware, whimsical wall art, and candles scented with fresh herbs and spices can add the finishing touches that make a home feel more grounded and welcoming.

Whether you crave sustainable products for your condo or an outdoor oasis in which to get to know your neighbors, Hayes Valley has it. “It’s so dynamic,” says Austin Gates, a local realtor. “I think green spaces are really important factors for building a neighborhood for quality of life.” In Hayes Valley, Gates adds, “the community benefits” of this approach “are snowballing.”

 

Art Around Town: Hayes Valley’s Public Art Installations

The transformation of Hayes Valley is one of the great success stories of 21st-century San Francisco. Patricia Walkup, a local community activist, founded the Hayes Valley Neighborhood Association and worked for decades to improve the neighborhood by lobbying the city to reduce crime, create housing and open space, and replace the discontinued section of the Freeway with tree-lined Octavia Boulevard. The neighborhood’s famed green space and outdoor art gallery, Patricia’s Green, is named in Walkup’s honor.

The transformation of Hayes Valley is one of the great success stories of 21st-century San Francisco. Patricia Walkup, a local community activist, founded the Hayes Valley Neighborhood Association and worked for decades to improve the neighborhood by lobbying the city to reduce crime, create housing and open space, and replace the discontinued section of the Freeway with tree-lined Octavia Boulevard. The neighborhood’s famed green space and outdoor art gallery, Patricia’s Green, is named in Walkup’s honor.

The first installation on the space, the Hayes Green Temple, was built by David Best, who is perhaps most famous for his Burning Man temples. This summer, Best was invited back to create a new temple at Patricia’s Green, and The Temple at Patricia’s Green went up on June 26. The structure will be in place—uniquely for a Best temple—for a full year. Like the stories behind the neighborhood’s revitalization and Patricia’s Green itself, the design and intent of the temple, which Best says “has no life until the community brings that life to it,” reflect both the neighborhood’s strong sense of community and the Hayes Valley commitment to public art.

Another example of this commitment to public art is the Hayes Valley Mural Project, which began in 2011 with two large iconic pieces by British artist Eine, Brighter Faster and Great Adventure. There are other large sponsored murals here and there: the recently unveiled psychedelic piece at Van Ness and Market is a collaboration between Caratoes, Lolo, and Tati, internationally recognized women street artists from, respectively, Hong Kong, Oakland, and Miami. How Can We See More Than Skin Color went up last spring, with residents joining in the project by providing suggestions and answers on stickers integrated into the piece. The neighborhood’s newest mural is Sam Flores’s piece on Linden Street. “Unofficial” murals also pop up throughout the area; an artist known as McFry frequently posts small paintings on telephone poles, walls, and even traffic cones that often feature a whimsical “owlbear,” a childlike animal with a bear’s body and an owl’s face.

A stroll through Hayes Valley can feel like a visit to a hip, urban outdoor gallery, one in which world-famous artists appear next to and often collaborate with anonymous local residents on works that are necessarily, like the neighborhood itself, subject to time and change. New pieces and projects appear constantly; currently underway is a “walk in” outdoor movie theater funded through a Kickstarter campaign. A notable piece, the 2005 Ghinlon/Transcope, deserves mention both for its concept and because, like most of the neighborhood’s installations, it was transient and is now only a memory. The piece consisted of a dozen transcopes along Octavia Boulevard that were designed by Berkeley-based artist Po Shu Wang as miniature observatories, each transforming the traffic along the boulevard into a unique kind of kinetic image. Every view existed only for the moment and only for the specific viewer whose eye was pressed to the viewing lens.

Along with a roster of frequent community events, the SFJAZZ Center, the Hayes Valley Farm, and the ever-growing collection of local boutiques, restaurants, and galleries, the art scene in Hayes Valley has helped make the neighborhood one of most active and attractive parts of San Francisco. With a dedicated sense of its own history and an eager desire to develop and offer Hayes Valley homes for sale to the city’s continuing influx of new residents, the area provides those searching for San Francisco condos and apartments the best of the Bay Area’s exciting new developments while retaining and improving on the sense of local charm and neighborhood pride that have characterized the City by the Bay for so long.

Jam Francisco: A Music Round-up

San Francisco has been home to one of the most eclectic and well-regarded music scenes in the US for decades. There’s a refined mixture in the Bay Area: smaller clubs loaded with character and personality, larger venues with fascinating histories, and a diverse roster of performances and music festivals.

San Francisco has been home to one of the most eclectic and well-regarded music scenes in the US for decades. There’s a refined mixture in the Bay Area: smaller clubs loaded with character and personality, larger venues with fascinating histories, and a diverse roster of performances and music festivals. Recent years have yielded an influx of new live performance sites that tend to cater to contemporary independent music, yet there are many older jazz clubs that keep their feet firmly planted in genre, time, and place. What follows is a brief list of venues that reflect the vibrant diversity of San Fran’s music scene:

Rickshaw Stop | 155 Fell Street

Rickshaw Stop is decidedly no-frills. This Hayes Valley bar is the place you go to catch that new band you’ve discovered while they’re doing a small club tour—or to unearth a new sound or artist previously unknown to you. It’s mostly a rock venue, so if it wasn’t at least a little dingy, it wouldn’t provide the proper ambience. Though on the small side, Rickshaw Stop is still sizable enough to nab many well-known bands and performers. The experience is all about the music itself—a spot on the floor puts you right in the action, mere feet away from the band.

Underground SF | 424 Haight Street

This mostly electronica venue is a colorful, enchanting space that seems to draw an energetic crowd every night of the week. An epicenter for drum and bass enthusiasts for years now, Underground SF (also located in Hayes Valley) attracts premier DJs and electronic artists from around the globe. It’s not a large venue, but – much like Rickshaw Stop – it has character and grit to spare.

The Chapel | 777 Valencia Street

The Chapel is a new venue that feels like an old venue—and that is meant as an unmitigated compliment.  Built in a massive mortuary originally constructed in 1914, the space is absolutely stunning and the acoustics are great. The Chapel books an array of impressive indie rock bands, and there isn’t a bad seat in the house. Come for the aesthetics, stay for the music.

The Fillmore | 1805 Geary Boulevard

Undoubtedly the most legendary venue in San Francisco, The Fillmore is as historic as they come, but its programming is as fresh as ever. Jimi Hendrix, the Grateful Dead, The Doors, The Who, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, The Velvet Underground, and scores of other rock gods have graced the Fillmore’s stage. It’s a special place, and you get that feeling immediately upon entering—almost as if all the different sounds that have reverberated off the walls there for the past five decades continue to hang in the air. New acts, both familiar and emerging, grace the Fillmore’s stage today, where an intriguing mix of musical genres is on display from week to week.

Great Living and Great Literature in Hayes Valley

Hayes Valley San Francisco is a gem of a neighborhood that is remarkably serene despite its central and convenient location. It is also the perfect urban landscape for reading and reflection. Apart from the luxurious reading nooks one might create inside the condos for sale in this coveted area of SF, wonderful cafes, a pop-up market patio, and the nearby lush tree cover of the Golden Gate Park Panhandle offer a plethora of other places to sit back, relax, and lose yourself in the wonder of words.

Hayes Valley San Francisco is a gem of a neighborhood that is remarkably serene despite its central and convenient location. It is also the perfect urban landscape for reading and reflection. Apart from the luxurious reading nooks one might create inside the condos for sale in this coveted area of SF, wonderful cafes, a pop-up market patio, and the nearby lush tree cover of the Golden Gate Park Panhandle offer a plethora of other places to sit back, relax, and lose yourself in the wonder of words.

Mercury Café on Octavia offers a menu of delicious, locally sourced, and organic selections along with direct-trade artisanal coffees from De La Paz Coffee. Washed all day in sunlight, the cafe also boasts high ceilings and bright Southwestern-style tiling. The support column outside is painted as a colorful San Francisco totem, marking your entry into a place that seems to be meant for archetypal mythos and invention. It’s also the perfect place to crack open the work of a living Bay Area literary luminary like Dave Eggers, Michael Chabon, or Armistead Maupin.

Blue Bottle Coffee offers a contemporary take on the San Francisco Beats’ famous convention-scorning spirit through its quirky kiosk on Linden. This satellite location of the celebrated craft coffee maker is built into a former garage space at the end of an alleyway. Coffee connoisseurs line up down the sidewalk for a taste of Blue Bottle’s freshly roasted liquid treasures. You might opt to dig into some Jack Kerouac once your mind is properly amped to confront the mad dance of existence, or use your caffeine perk to hop on a hard-boiled crime trail with Dashiell Hammett.

Proxy at the corner of Hayes and Octavia provides a new and dynamic two-block centerpiece to Hayes Valley. The ecological spirit of San Francisco is on display here in the form of recycled shipping containers that house a rotating array of local food and drink vendors (as well as retailers and service providers such as current residents Aether Apparel and Basic Training). Consider enjoying a treat from Smitten Ice Cream or an adult beverage from Ritual Biergarten while you expand your mind with historical tales of San Francisco from Jack London or Mark Twain.

Just a short hike up Fell Street brings you into the famous Panhandle of Golden Gate Park. Here you can nestle up to a tree trunk, claim a quiet bench, or spread out on a sunny patch of grass. The shade and swish of branches will lull your senses while you contemplate what is, what was, and what’s to come in San Francisco, perhaps while reading a copy of Rebecca Solnit’s local cultural atlas, Infinite City.

48 Hours at Fulton 555

With Fulton 555 serving as your home base, you can enjoy the best that the vibrant Hayes Valley neighborhood has to offer. Although Fulton 555 is located steps from San Francisco public transportation, there’s a good chance on most days you’ll find everything you need within walking distance.

With Fulton 555 serving as your home base, you can enjoy the best that the vibrant Hayes Valley neighborhood has to offer. Although Fulton 555 is located steps from San Francisco public transportation, there’s a good chance on most days you’ll find everything you need within walking distance.

Start your day with breakfast and a cup of joe in your Fulton 555 kitchen. All Fulton 555 residences have centerpiece kitchens designed to be remarkably useful as well as beautiful. Enjoy top-of-the-line appliances and sleek, crafted finishes as well as generous storage space for your ingredients and culinary tools. Stock up with food and other essentials from Fulton 555’s future onsite grocery store, which will feature a tempting array of fresh produce, meat and cheese, coffee and tea, and other necessities.

Follow your morning repast with a bike ride to enjoy a tour of Hayes Valley’s eclectic mix of 19th-century and contemporary architecture. Travel about 5.5 miles to the beach through rows of Victorians as well as Golden Gate Park. Great food and drink await you where the park meets the beach. One of Fulton 555’s most clever amenities is its bike shop for residents. If you experience a flat tire while on your city adventure, simply ride public transportation home, where you can fix your bike in the fully equipped repair center.

When you simply want to walk and explore the shops, dining options, and curiosities that make Hayes Valley special, your options are endless. Hayes Valley is loaded with great food and drink. One of the best beer halls in town, Biergarten on Octavia, is idyllic on a sunny day or a warm evening. Beer paired with reinterpreted German comfort food like pork belly sliders, bratwurst with potatoes, and warm pretzels with mustard and horseradish make this a good spot to hit after you’ve worked up an appetite.

If you’re seeking something lighter and a bit luxurious, try Rich Table on Gough Street, which offers original takes on farm-to-table classics. The legendary porcini doughnuts with raclette dipping sauce have something of a cult following, while scallops with cucumber; spring pasta with peas, shrimp, or chorizo; avocado salad; and burrata with summer squash and tomato keep locals and visitors coming back to this elegant and cozy eatery.

Craving a well-mixed after-dinner drink? Two Sisters Bar and Books offers a menu like no other featuring small plates such as deviled eggs, salmon sliders, and a nice selection of charcuterie and cheese. Also offering a wide array of cocktails and wines and a library of vintage books for browsing, Two Sisters was inspired by the cafe culture of cities like Vienna and Paris, where patrons are encouraged to linger and enjoy. Here, you’ll find charming drinks with names like Bergamot Bee’s Knees and Dark Knight, and you can spend time talking with friends or simply enjoying the ambience.
When the weather is nice, an evening spent on the rooftop terrace at Fulton 555 is hard to beat. Thanks to its city views and landscaped greenery – not to mention the quiet that comes from a little distance from the hustle and bustle below – the Fulton 555 terrace offers the perfect place for a little stargazing to wrap up a fun-filled day in Hayes Valley.

The Sounds of San Francisco: July Highlights

One of the perks of living at Fulton 555 is its proximity to some of San Francisco’s top performing arts venues. Offering easy access to shows featuring everything from new, emerging bands to classical music and jazz, Hayes Valley is right at the center of the city’s vibrant cultural scene. Summer concerts and performances abound; here’s a short list of some standout events on the calendar.

One of the perks of living at Fulton 555 is its proximity to some of San Francisco’s top performing arts venues. Offering easy access to shows featuring everything from new, emerging bands to classical music and jazz, Hayes Valley is right at the center of the city’s vibrant cultural scene. Summer concerts and performances abound; here’s a short list of some standout events on the calendar.

San Francisco Symphony (201 Van Ness Avenue)

The venerable San Francisco Symphony is one of the city’s most established performing arts organizations. Founded in 1911, it has grown to include the San Francisco Symphony Chorus, founded in 1972, and the San Francisco Symphony Youth Orchestra, founded in 1981. The Symphony’s programming is primarily classical but also experimental and fresh. This summer’s lineup includes the US orchestral debut of West African songwriter and vocalist Angélique Kidjo, who will perform selections from her new album “Angélique Kidjo Sings” as well as from George Gershwin. The performance will also include the US premiere of work by Philip Glass. The next day on July 11, it’s back to the classics with “A Beethoven Celebration,” which will feature some of the great Romantic composer’s “firsts,” including his First Symphony.

SFJAZZ Center (201 Franklin Street)

SFJAZZ is a feast for the ears and the eyes. For starters, the center’s second floor houses three ceramic murals that create a cityscape and tell the story of jazz in America and in San Francisco’s legendary music venues like Jimbo’s Bop City. Jazz is alive and well at SFJAZZ, which offers a full calendar of performances, classes, and community events. On July 19, Freddy Cole pays tribute to his legendary older brother, Nat King Cole, with an evening of gems from the American Songbook. The following week on July 23, Mexican pop sensation Natalia Lafourcade will perform songs from her new album, Hasta La Raíz, which translates as “to the root.” The album is a direct result of Lafourcade’s travels throughout South America. The band Tinariwen, Tuareg rockers from Northern Africa who collaborated on their latest album with Josh Klinghoffer of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, will take the stage on August 15. Known as “desert blues,” Tinariwen’s signature sound is a unique blend of Arabian, Berber, and African influences with a jolt of Western psychedelic rock thrown in for good measure.

Stern Grove (Sloat Boulevard)

Nestled inside an amphitheater ringed by eucalyptus, redwood, and fir trees, Stern Grove has been presenting live concerts free of charge every summer for 78 years. This summer’s lineup includes artists from around the world who work in a diverse array of musical genres. On July 5, the San Francisco Symphony presents Shara Worden, lead vocalist of My Brightest Diamond, performing selections from her band reinterpreted for an orchestra. On July 12, Hawaii’s top-selling female vocalist of all time, Amy Hānaiali‘i, will perform with the Stern Grove Festival Orchestra and Halau ‘o Keikiali‘i, a San Francisco-based Hawaiian cultural organization. On August 18, Brooklyn-based rapper Talib Kweli will be joined by Oakland native Zakiya Harris and her band Elephantine for an evening of hip-hop, Afro-beat, electronica, and soul. Harris is Chief Education Officer at Hack the Hood, an award-winning program designed to provide access to technology for low-income youth of color.